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Intellect

Jane Manning James exhibition opens in HBLL Special Collections

The Harold B. Lee Library Special Collections has opened a special exhibition about the life of Jane Manning James, on display from Feb. 10-28.

James was the first African-American woman to cross the plains and settle in Utah as a Mormon pioneer. She's seen as a beacon of courage, determination, and faith to the early Latter-day Saints. The new Jane Manning James exhibition features photographs, maps and papers from the life of James and her descendants.

“I admire the way she carried her family through the trek,” says Laura Molnar, a student involved in creating the display, “She was so patient. She stood for her rights, but didn’t doubt the gospel.”

Another student, Sean Parker, said he was inspired by James’ “lack of doubt” despite the trials she endured.

The exhibition is located just left of the Special Collections doors on Level 1, and will be open from 8 a.m to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

To learn more about Jane Manning James’ legacy of faith and courage, look for upcoming information on the play “I Am Jane” which will be performed at the "Education in Zion" theater (B192 JFSB) from Feb. 25 - March 1. Tickets go on sale Feb. 18 at the Wilkinson Center information desk, (801) 422-4313.

Writer: Libby Thomas

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