Skip to main content
Intellect

James E. Faulconer is new associate director of BYU Faculty Center

James E. Faulconer, a professor of philosophy at Brigham Young University, has been named associate director of the Faculty Center, replacing Robert L. Millet who will return to full-time teaching and research in Religious Education.

"He brings to the Faculty Center a wealth of experiences that will allow him to make a substantial contribution to it essential mission in faculty development and improvement of teaching and learning, said Richard N. Williams, associate academic vice president for faculty.

The appointment was effective July 1.

Faulconer has previously served as Philosophy Department chair and as dean of General Education and Honors at BYU. He was a visiting faculty member at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, in 1995.

A BYU alumnus, Faulconer received master's and doctoral degrees in philosophy from Pennsylvania State University.

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
August 12, 2020
To date, Congress has authorized roughly $3 trillion in COVID-19 relief assistance— the largest relief package in history. With more COVID relief money on the way, a new study led by two Brigham Young University business professors finds these newly available funds led to a significant surge in health sector lobbying activity, especially within the pharmaceutical industry.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
August 05, 2020
Launched in January of 2016, the Cambodian Oral History Project works to collect and preserve the records of the Cambodian people.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
August 05, 2020
Because 60% of biology undergraduates nationwide are female, the life sciences have long been thought to enjoy more gender equity than other STEM fields. But a new BYU study challenges the notion that all is well for gender parity in biology classrooms.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=