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Intellect

Islam and Turkey topic of BYU lecture Jan. 29

Political scientist M. Hakan Yavuz from the University of Utah will present his study, "The Zones of Islam: the Case of Turkey," Wednesday (Jan. 29) in 238 Herald R. Clark Building on Brigham Young University's campus as part of the David M. Kennedy Center's International Forum Series.

Yavuz earned his bachelor's degree from the University of Ankara, where he also taught political science for several years. He then studied at the Leonard David Institute at Hebrew University in Jerusalem and later earned his master's degree and Ph.D. in political science from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Fluent in English, Turkish, Uzbek, Kazakh, Azeri and Arabic, Yavuz has published dozens of journal articles and book chapters in many countries around the globe. He has also received several prestigious scholarships including the Rockefeller Fellowship in its program in Religion, Conflict and Peace Building.

The International Forum Series was established to expose the BYU community to scholars and world dignitaries as they present their research and views on events of world import. Access http://kennedy.byu.edu for more information or a lecture series schedule.

Writer: Craig Kartchner

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