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Intellect

Hungarian ambassador plans BYU lecture March 18

His Excellency Bela Szombati, Hungarian ambassador to the United States, will be speaking on Hungarian and U.S. relations at Brigham Young University Thursday, March 18, at 11 a.m. in B-002 Joseph F. Smith Building, hosted by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies.

Szombati has served as ambassador since 2009. During his career he has served as head of Strategic Planning of Foreign Affairs, ambassador to the U.K. and France, deputy head of the State Secretariat for European Integration, foreign policy adviser to the Hungarian president and head of the Foreign Relations Department of the President’s Office.

Having previously served in Washington as cultural attaché at the Hungarian Embassy, Szombati has also held posts at the Hungarian Embassy in Vietnam as well as in the Foreign Ministry’s Departments for North America, Asia, Western Europe and International Security.

He joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1980 after receiving degrees from London University and Eotvos Lorand University in Budapest.

For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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