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Intellect

Hispanic scholar to present Chauncy Harris Lecture at BYU Nov. 18

Daniel Arreola, named by Brigham Young University as the 2004 Chauncy Harris Distinguished Lecturer, will speak at 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 18, in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium.

Arreola, an Arizona State University professor, will focus his lecture on material from his latest book, "Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places," which explores the regional cultural geography of Americans who have Hispanic and Latino ancestry.

As an author who has published extensively in scholarly journals and in book chapters relating to cultural geography, Arreola serves on the editorial boards of several leading geography journals.

Sponsored by the Department of Geography and the College of Family Home and Social Sciences, the Chauncy Harris lecture is given by a distinguished geographer who spends a few days on campus lecturing, teaching, advising and visiting with students and faculty in the department.

Now in its second year, The Chauncy Harris Lecture was endowed at BYU by Harris, his wife Edith, their daughter Margaret and her husband Phillip A. Strauss Jr.

For information about Arreola or the Chauncy Harris Lecture, please contact Heather Harris in the Geography Department at (801) 422-5470, heather_harris@byu.edu.

Writer: Devin Knighton

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