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Intellect

Happy Birthday, Bach! BYU organist plans annual concert March 21

J.S. Bach would be 322 this year, and Brigham Young University faculty organist Douglas Bush will continue to honor the day with his annual recital on Wednesday, March 21, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall. Admission will be free.

"The program is designed to give a cross section of Bach's creative work from early on to the end of his life," Bush said. "Throughout his life, Bach was pushing the envelope in terms of new ideas, and was always defining his own techniques."

In Bach's autographed manuscripts, the first page always includes the initials JJ translated as "Jesus Help Me," and the last page ends with SDG signifying "To God Alone the Glory."

"I think the religious references in Bach's manuscripts indicate the tenor of his creative life," Bush said. "Though Bach was aware of his capabilities, I think his mission was primarily glorifying God through his music."

Bush teaches full-time in the School of Music specializing in organ keyboard. He has performed throughout Europe and across the United States, has conducted a variety of master classes and has recorded several CD's and has worked as an organ consultant. He is editing an encyclopedia on the organ to be published by Routledge Press in New York City.For more information, contact Douglas Bush at (801) 422-3159.

Writer: Brooke Eddington

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