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Intellect

Government intelligence topic for pair of lectures at BYU April 7

Brigham Young University’s David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies will be hosting two lectures about government intelligence on Wednesday, April 7.

• Peter Martland, history professor at the University of Cambridge, will be speaking about “Anglo-American Intelligence on the Eve of WWII” at 2 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Martland teaches and lecturers about history for the Pembroke College International Program. He is also a researcher at Corpus Christi College and has a number of academic appointments. He has published “Lord Haw Haw: The English Voice of Nazi Germany.” The book is a biography of an American-born Nazi broadcaster and propagandist.

• Nicholas Dujmovic, CIA staff historian, will also be speaking at 3 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building. He will be discussing new research in CIA history.

Dujmovic has been a CIA historian since 2005, where he researches, writes and presents on agency activities. While at the CIA he has worked as an analyst on the USSR and East Europe, a speechwriter for the director of Central Intelligence, editor and manager of analysts.

Both of these lectures will be available online at kennedy.byu.edu.

For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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