Skip to main content
Intellect

Gordon B. Hinckley Alumni and Visitors Center Gets "Topped"

The construction of the Gordon B. Hinckley Alumni and Visitors Center reached a milestone during a "topping out" ceremony Dec. 8. Topping out is a term used by steel workers that signifies the last piece of steel being hoisted into place on a structure. For the GBHB the designated piece of steel is a pyramid-shaped roof section for the clock tower weighing 14,000 pounds.

"The clock tower is very appropriate to receive the last piece of steel," says King Husein, owner of Span Construction & Engineering, who, in conjunction with Okland Construction, has the responsibility of erecting the new building. "It will become the newest landmark on campus."

From the first floor to the top, the clock tower extends 122 feet according to Span's superintendent Don Breneman. As the steel erection portion comes to a close, work has already begun on the interior.

Duct work, steel stud framing, electrical and mechanical work, insulation, ceiling grids and more are steadily reaching all levels. The building is on schedule to be completed by fall 2007.

Before the roof section was put in place guests, including President Cecil O. Samuelson, had the opportunity to sign the last piece of steel with paint pens.

Writer: Charlene Winters

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
February 23, 2021
Dr. Dambisa Moyo, a Zambian-born international economist who analyzes macroeconomics and global affairs, delivered Tuesday’s forum address. She spoke on the macroeconomic, geopolitical and social trends defining our world.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
February 23, 2021
Leaders of U.S. Special Operations Command have turned to the expertise of two Brigham Young University professors for advice on the high-stakes ethical dilemmas their forces face.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
February 12, 2021
The study found that fathers who had more sons were more likely to vote for a stronger national government than fathers of daughters, who preferred a weaker national government with greater state authority.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=