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Intellect

Geography Department and BYU students to study downtown Provo options

Brigham Young University's Geography Department and BYU Students for New Urbanism will gather information on the revitalization of downtown Provo in several campus meetings Thursday, March 25, through Saturday, March 27.

Richard Jackson, geography professor, said the project will bring together students, faculty members, city leaders and professionals from various fields (urban planning, design, architecture, business, and more) to develop plans for the future of downtown Provo, how it can be improved and how BYU students will fit into those plans.

A kickoff meeting will take place Thursday, March 25, at 6 p.m. in 3718 Lee Library. Group discussions will follow.

Friday's events will begin at 3 p.m. with a group/open discussion in 3233, 3237 and 3239 Wilkinson Student Center. Other events include a walkthrough of downtown Provo, and work groups.

Saturday's events begin at 8:30 a.m. with a welcome meeting and group discussion held in 3233 Wilkinson Student Center. Other events Saturday include intergroup forums and collaborations, business planning, transportation design, site plan drawings and presentation creation.

Writer: Rachel Sego

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