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Intellect

Frank Capra's "Lost Horizon" at BYU film series Sept. 13

“Lost Horizon,” based on the novel by James Hilton and directed by Frank Capra, will have a one-time-only screening Friday, Sept. 13, at 7 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium on level one to open the 15th season of the Brigham Young University Motion Picture Archive Film Series.

Admission is free, but seating is limited. Children age eight and over are welcome. No food or drink is permitted in the auditorium.

James D’Arc, curator of the BYU Motion Picture Archive, will introduce the film with a behind-the-scenes perspective on one of the most expensive Hollywood films of that decade.

Ronald Colman and Jane Wyatt star in this 1937 film classic about a diverse group of travelers escaping a revolution in China only to be taken to a remote area in Tibet called Shangri-La. One film historian said “Lost Horizon” is “one of the most impressive of all '30s films, a splendid fantasy which, physically and emotionally, lets out all the stops.”

For more information about the BYU Motion Picture Archive Film Series and its schedule, visit  sc.lib.byu.edu.

Writer: Hwa Lee

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