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Intellect

Folk music ensembles join forces for BYU concert Nov. 17

Combining the talents of several folk music groups, the Brigham Young University School of Music will host the Folk Music Ensemble Concert Friday, Nov. 17, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

Admission will be $9 or $6 with a BYU or student ID. Tickets can be purchased at the Fine Arts Ticket Office, by calling (801) 422-7664 or by visiting performances.byu.edu.

First on the program will be the BYU Celtic Ensemble, which will perform several traditional European tunes, such as “Sir Eglamore,” “The Cobbler’s Daughter” and “Aibreann.” BYU faculty member Mark Geslison’s arrangement of “Red-haired Boy” will also be featured.

Following the Celtic Ensemble, the BYU Bluegrass Ensemble is slated to feature a series of American melodies, including “He Will Listen to You” and the fiddle tunes “Gypsy Rag” and “Cotton-Patch Tag.” The group’s performance will conclude with an arrangement of “This Sad Song” by popular country singer Alison Krauss.

The concert will wrap up with the group Cold Creek, whose repertoire will be announced during the performance.

For more information, contact Mark Geslison at (801) 422-3655.

Writer: Elizabeth Kasper

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