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Intellect

Fanciful award-winning artwork on display at Lee Library

A series of fanciful art forms by a Brigham Young University student artist who won a major art grant from a Park City ski resort will be on display at BYU's Harold B. Lee Library.

Beginning April 15 and running through June 28, John Gumaelius' "Guppets" will be presented in the Auditorium Gallery on the Lee Library's first level. His presentation will include five performances of his sculptures April 15 at 7 p.m., April 18 at noon and 7 p.m., April 25 at 7 p.m. and June 27 at 7 p.m.

There will also be an opening reception April 15 from 6 to 8 p.m. Admission to the performances and exhibit is free.

Gumaelius and fellow BYU student Chelsy Smith were the winners of the Canyons Resort's public arts contest "Earth, Wind, Water and Fire." Their life-size works of art will be displayed at the Canyons Resort.

Smith and Gumaelius received nearly $4,000 for materials needed to construct their sculptures. Upon completion of the projects, Smith and Gumaelius will also be awarded with $4,000 each.

Criteria for the pieces required that they be life-sized, about six-feet tall and constructed of weather-friendly materials.

Gumaelius describes his sculpture designs as a "three-headed puppet dragon bird." Because he is skilled at creating mechanical puppets, each head will be connected to a lever with a chain.

"You can pull on the lever, and it'll open and close the beaks," he said. "Then on top of each head are propellers that spin in the wind.

Smith's design for the resort incorporates the mountains illustrated in the Canyons logo, stacking the mountains sideways and vertically, transforming from mountains to human-like figures.

Writer: Elizabeth B. Jensen

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