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Intellect

Falcon expert at Bean Museum Tanner lecture Nov. 21

One of the world's foremost authorities on falcons will speak as part of the John Tanner Lectureship Thursday (Nov. 21) at 7 p.m in the Tanner Auditorium of the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum at Brigham Young University.

Clayton White, a BYU professor of zoology, will present his lecture, "To Parts Unknown: From the Arctic to the Tropics in Search of the Peregrine Falcon," after a public reception at 6:30 p.m.

The lectureship began in 1989 when the John Tanner Family Organization donated funds to support an annual speaker and reception. While one lecturer was invited annually for the first 12 years, funds eventually became available for two speakers per year.

Speakers from across the nation have been selected to participate in the esteemed lectureship based on effort and expertise in natural history and human issues.

The Tanner family has been very influential in Utah and BYU culture since John Tanner, a 19th century businessman, provided desperately needed support to the westward movement of the Mormon pioneers.

Writer: Craig Kartchner

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