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Intellect

Faculty Women's Association hosts lecture Nov. 3

Elizabeth Sewell, associate director for the International Center for Law & Religious Studies at Brigham Young University, will present on the progress of religious freedom throughout the world at a Faculty Women’s Association meeting Thursday, Nov. 3, at 2 p.m. in the Little Theater of the Wilkinson Student Center.

All BYU faculty members are invited to attend.

The BYU International Center for Law and Religious Studies works with scholars, government leaders, nongovernmental groups and religious organizations from a variety of countries and faith traditions who play an important role in promoting religious liberty.

The center has worked in mitigating the effects of the restrictive Russian law on religious associations, responding to requests for input on draft laws affecting religious believers in numerous countries and working with religious organizations in war-torn Bosnia to develop a religious association’s law that will provide protection for all religious groups.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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