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Intellect

"Face of England" photo exhibit featured at David M. Kennedy Center

Images captured during Brigham Young University’s fall 2007 London Study Abroad program are currently being exhibited at the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies in the Herald R. Clark Building.

The 16-image exhibit is a sampling of digital photography by BYU students Christian Smith, Katy Taylor, Carly Cowser and Greg Steele.

Though their work features a variety of styles and subjects, together they capture many of the faces England offers from the iconic to the undiscovered and from pastoral landscapes to urban streets. This exhibit explores the impact this study abroad experience had on the students who participated in the program.

This exhibit will continue until late November when the winners of this year’s International Study Programs Photo Contest will be announced.

For more information on BYU's International Study Programs, please visit kennedy.byu.edu.

Writer: Brady Toone

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