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Intellect

Eurasian energy, national security subject for BYU lecture Feb. 11

Roger D. Kangas, a professor at the Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C., will present a David M. Kennedy Center Lecture, “Please Don’t Turn Out the Lights: Eurasian Energy and National Security,” Wednesday, Feb. 11, at 3 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building at Brigham Young University.

Kangas works with programs on terrorism and transnational threats. He is also an adjunct professor at Georgetown University and has written articles and book chapters on central Asian politics and security. His latest work is “Playing Solitaire: Competing National Security Strategies in Central Asia.”

From 1999 to 2007, he was a professor of central Asian studies at the George C. Marshall Center for European Security in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.

This lecture will be archived online. For more information on events sponsored by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies, see the calendar online at kennedy.byu.edu. For more information about this lecture, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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