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Intellect

Environmental controls in Venice topic of BYU lecture March 17

A history professor from the University of Oregon will discuss the effects of state-sponsored attempts to control the environment in Venice, Italy, during an International Forum Series lecture Wednesday, March 17, at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building on the Brigham Young University campus.

Karl Appuhn, assistant professor of renaissance and environmental history, will speak on “Drowning a Renaissance City: The Dilemmas of Flood Control in Venice from the Renaissance to the Present."

The lecture is free and the public is invited to attend.

Appuhn’s research has focused on the political, economic and technological dimensions of state-sponsored attempts to control the environment. Recently, he has begun researching the intellectual history of the environment and the history of tourism.

Appuhn has been a Mellon Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities at Columbia University and a visiting lecturer in Renaissance history for the Venice Program at the University of Warwick, United Kingdom.

The lecture is sponsored by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies. The center archives lectures and posts a calendar online at http://kennedy.byu.edu.

For more information about this or other lectures, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Lee Simons

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