Skip to main content
Intellect

Einstein's legacy topic for BYU astronomy lecture Sept. 1

David Neilsen of Brigham Young University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy faculty will be presenting “Albert Einstein’s Legacy: Big Bang, Black Holes and Gravity Waves” on Tuesday, Sept. 1, in 1060 Harold B. Lee Library.

The presentation will be held in connection with the International Year of Astronomy. Seating begins at 7 p.m. and the lecture will begin at 7:30 p.m. A short question-and-answer session will follow. If weather permits, telescopes on top of the Eyering Science Center will also be open from 8:30 to 10 p.m. The public is welcome, and admission is free.

Black holes warp the space and time around them, and moving black holes send out waves like ripples on a pond, said Nielsen. “These gravitational waves carry interesting information about the black holes that created them, and how they were formed,” he said.

Neilsen will discuss efforts to detect gravitational waves on earth, and what we can learn from them about black holes, neutrons stars and the big bang.

He graduated from BYU with a bachelor’s and master’s degrees in physics and received a doctorate in physics from the University of Texas at Austin in 1999. He worked at UT Austin and Louisiana State University before joining the BYU faculty in 2004.

For more information, contact David Neilsen at (801) 422-6078.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

Forum: A higher purpose for religious education

January 31, 2023
In Tuesday’s forum, Rabbi Dr. Ari Berman, president of Yeshiva University, described religious education as a potential antidote to America’s pervasive consumerism.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Women are routinely excluded from exercise research across the country. A new BYU study shows why that’s misguided

January 26, 2023
A new BYU study debunks the assumption that menstrual cycles disqualify women from exercise research. Analyzing women’s exercise performance across their menstrual cycles, researchers found no variability in endurance thresholds or performance: from workout to workout, women’s performance was just as consistent as men’s.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU business study: Key to innovation is fostering intellectual honesty

January 19, 2023
New research published this week from BYU Marriott School of Business professors Jeff Dyer and Taeya Howell finds that innovation can be hampered when organizations prioritize “psychological safety” at the expense of intellectual honesty.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=