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Intellect

Douglas E. Bush to give organ recital at BYU Oct. 10

Douglas E. Bush, a faculty member in the Brigham Young University School of Music, will present a faculty organ recital Friday, Oct. 10, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall. This program was originally scheduled for Sept. 19

The program will focus on various German hymns from the Baroque and Romantic periods. Admission to the performance is free and the public is welcome to attend.

The recital will open with the Praeludium in C Major by Georg Böhm and conclude with the Praeludium in D minor by Johann Pachelbel, both contemporaries of Johann Sebastian Bach. The performance will include “Alleluja” by Koloss István, the Hungarian composer and organist of the St. Stephen’s Basilica in Budapest.

Bush will also perform two of his own compositions including “Cantio Rustica Americana,” based on American folk songs in the style of famous 17th century composer Samuel Scheidt, as well as an arrangement of three hymns.

Bush teaches in the School of Music specializing in organ keyboard. He has performed throughout Europe and across the United States, has conducted a variety of master classes and has recorded several CDs. He edited an encyclopedia on the organ published by Routledge Press in New York City.

For more information, contact Douglas E. Bush at (801) 422-3159.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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