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Intellect

Disabilities and the Gospel subject of annual lecture Nov. 4

Tina Dyches from the Brigham Young University McKay School of Education will deliver the 2010 Alice Louise Reynolds Women-in-Scholarship Lecture, “Viewing Disability Through a Gospel Lens," Thursday, Nov. 4, at 2 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium.

Dyches, a professor in the school’s Counseling and Special Education Department, has professional experience in curriculum development, instruction and teaching those who have severe disabilities. Her research deals with the family’s adaptation to disability and chronic conditions, multicultural issues in autism and analysis of children's literature that characterizes individuals with disabilities.

The lecture series honors Alice Louise Reynolds, who was the first woman to teach college-level courses at Brigham Young Academy as well as the first woman to become a professor at BYU. The Alice Louise Reynolds Room in the Lee Library is a memorial and permanent tribute to her achievements.

For more details about this lecture, contact Roger Layton, HBLL communications manager, at (801) 422- 6687 or roger_layton@byu.edu .

Writer: Philip Volmar

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