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Intellect

David Paxman to present BYU devotional address July 27

English professor David Paxman will be the devotional speaker at Brigham Young University Tuesday, July 27, at 11:05 a.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

The devotional will be broadcast live on the BYU Broadcasting channels and online at byub.org. Rebroadcast and archive information will be available at byub.org/devotionals or speeches.byu.edu.

Paxman specializes in late 17th- and 18th-century British literature. He also focuses on prose fiction, intellectual history, poetry and regional literacy culture.

His current research includes the subject of the family in novels and the application of cognitive science to literary study. He has been published in Modern Philology, Eighteenth-Century Studies and the Journal of the History of Ideas.

Paxman received his doctorate from the University of Chicago in 1982. He was awarded the College of Humanities Barker Lectureship in 1997 and was a BYU Alcuin Fellow in 1999.

For more information, contact David Paxman at (801) 422-2173.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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