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"Da Vinci Code" topic of BYU museum lecture series, exhibit

The Brigham Young University Museum of Art is sponsoring a lecture series on best-selling novel “The Da Vinci Code,” held in conjunction with a new exhibition opening this spring.

The lecture series, titled “The Da Vinci Code: Mystery, Metaphor and Meaning, LDS Perspectives on 'The Da Vinci Code,'” will discuss various aspects of Dan Brown’s book.

A historical fiction novel, the book explores multiple theories held by scholars about hidden messages in certain paintings by Leonardo Da Vinci. The messages allegedly hold the secret of an ancient secret society and involve the Vatican and the Holy Grail.

The museum will host four lectures, all held at 7 p.m. in the level 3 Lied Gallery, leading up to the opening of the exhibit “Metaphorically Speaking: New Religious Art” on April 8. The exhibition will be comprised of mainly LDS artists who use metaphor and symbolism in their art.

Eric Huntsman, assistant professor of ancient scripture at BYU, will discuss “Mary Magdalene: Biblical Enigma” on Wednesday, Feb. 25.

Steven Bule, professor of art and humanities at Utah Valley State College, will lecture on “The Da Vinci Code: Separating Fact from Fiction” on Thursday, March 11.

Vern Swanson, Springville Art Museum director, will lecture about “On the Trail of The Holy Grail” on Thursday, March 25.

A panel discussion of experts on topics related to the book will be held Thursday, April 1.

Also, the Museum Store will offer a 20 percent discount on copies of “The Da Vinci Code” during February, March and April.

Admission is free and the public is invited to attend.

For more information about the lectures, call Cheryll May at (801) 422-8201.

Writer: Thomas Grover

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