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Intellect

Couple relationship programs subject for BYU lecture March 5

Internationally recognized clinical psychologist W. Kim Halford will discuss couple relationship programs during a lecture Wednesday, March 5, at 5 p.m. in the Joseph Smith Building Auditorium at Brigham Young University.

Sponsored by the School of Family Life, Halford’s Visiting Scholar Lecture is titled “Strengthening Couple Relationships to Enhance Human Well-Being: What Relationship Education Has to Offer.” The lecture is free and open to the public.

Halford is a professor of clinical psychology at Australia’s Griffith University. In addition to authoring more than 100 scholarly publications and presenting at more than 100 invited professional workshops in clinical practice, he is internationally recognized as the creator and team leader of the Couple Commitment and Relationship Enhancement (Couple CARE) program. The program is a self-directed learning course for couples entering marriage or a similar committed relationship who are at high risk of future relationship problems.

For more information, contact Abby Viveiros in the School of Family Life at (801) 422-4997.

Writer: Marissa Ballantyne

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