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Intellect

Constantinople topic of BYU Kennedy Center lecture Nov. 2

Monique O’Connell, associate professor of history at Wake Forest University, will speak on “Situating Constantinople: The Byzantine Empire in the Mediterranean” Wednesday, Nov. 2, at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building at Brigham Young University.

O’Connell is currently working on a synthetic history of the medieval and early modern Mediterranean with Eric Dursteler, a professor of history at BYU.

Her first book isMen of Empire: Power and Negotiation in Venice’s Maritime State(2009), she co-edited the electronic databaseRulers of Venice: 1332-1524, which is available through the Renaissance Society of America, and has recently published articles in California Italian Studies and the Journalof Early Modern History.

Her research has been funded by fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation and Harvard University’s Villa I Tatti Center for Renaissance Studies.

This lecture will be archived at kennedy.byu.edu/archive. For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 or lee_simons@byu.edu.

Writer: Melissa Connor

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