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Intellect

Computers using BYU network need virus protection

Virus infections attacked many universities across the nation at the beginning of fall semester, clogging their networks and causing many schools to implement new security measures.

Viruses can be more serious for universities that have little control over students' personal computers. Their networks are easily accessed across campus to aid in data sharing for students, faculty and staff, increasing the opportunity for fast-spread virus infections

Though some schools avoided the crippling effects of the August viruses, most schools are implementing new tactics to increase network security. Some universities began requiring all students to have their personal computers checked and scanned before connecting to the network this fall.

To help secure the BYU network from viruses, virus protection is strongly recommended on every computer connecting to the BYU campus network, said Nyle Elison, product manager for the Office of Information Technology.

"Students and employees need to apply Windows Updates to computers using a Microsoft Windows operating system," Elison said. "Keeping the operating system current will help protect against infections."

To prevent possible loss of service, the operating system and virus protection updates must be kept current.

For virus protection, students need to follow the instructions at http://it.byu.edu under "Virus Info" located in the right sidebar. Employees need to contact their CSRs or follow the instructions at http://it.byu.edu under "Virus Info" located in the right sidebar.

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