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Intellect

"Charge of the Light Brigade" at BYU Film Series Nov. 18

The historical motion picture drama "The Charge of the Light Brigade" will be shown at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 18 in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium at Brigham Young University as part of the ongoing Special Collections Motion Picture Archives Film Series.

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and admission is free. Children ages 8 and older are welcome to attend. No food or drink will be permitted in the auditorium.

Starring Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland, "The Charge of the Light Brigade" tells the story of 500 British light cavalry 150 years ago who were ordered to attack the Russians on the Balaclava Heights in what is today part of the Ukraine. The attack was the culminating act of the Crimean War.

Under the direction of Michael Curtiz, the film turned out to be one of the studio's greatest hits and assured the teaming of Flynn and de Havilland for six more movies.

The showing will be preceded with commentary by Malcolm Thorp of BYU's History Department regarding how the movie version of the famous charge and the actual recorded history compare.

The Special Collections Motion Picture Archives Film Series is co-sponsored by the L. Tom Perry Special Collections, the Friends of the Harold B. Lee Library and Dennis & Linda Gibson. For the complete season schedule, visit sc.lib.byu.edu or contact Special Collections at (801) 422-6371.

Writer: Devin Knighton

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