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Intellect

Changes in College of Nursing program to allow easier application, quicker graduation

Will allow increase of 48 graduates over five-year period

The Brigham Young University College of Nursing has announced changes to its major academic plan to simplify the application process and allow students to graduate earlier.

Starting in fall semester 2007, instead of being required to complete 12 classes prior to application, students will now be asked to take Nursing 180; Physiology and Developmental Biology 305; Marriage, Family and Human Development 210 or Psychology 220; and Chemistry 281, a class teaching a combination of organic and biochemistry. The remaining eight classes will be taken following application to the program.

The college made the change to conform to university guidelines, but also to increase the number of spots available in the program. The new course structure will allow an increase of 48 graduates over a five-year period. Students will also be able to complete their studies in four years, instead of the four and a half years of the past.

"It's going to allow us to have more nursing students, and we'll get them in faster and get them out faster," said Cara Wiley, assistant nursing adviser.

The college is also excited to be able to provide the community with more nurses, as the position is always in demand at local hospitals, she said.

Current nursing students and those who have begun preparation for the program will continue to study under the former guidelines. The college will operate under a dual admissions program during the transition process.

For more information, contact the College of Nursing Advisement Center at (801) 422-4173.

Writer: Elizabeth Kasper

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