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Intellect

Center for Teaching, Learning offers course design class Jan. 3

The BYU Center for Teaching and Learning is offering a useful “just-in-time” workshop for faculty and instructors, "Designing A Course for Significant Learning," Thursday, Jan. 3, from 9 a.m. to noon (location TBA).

Based on L.D. Fink’s model of course design, this workshop is valuable for any faculty member planning a new course or re-designing a current one. This hands-on workshop provides collaborative support for instructors as they create/modify their course(s) using the following:

  • Course learning outcomes
  • Learning assessments to evaluate the achievement of the course learning outcomes (e.g., tests, assignments, presentations, projects)
  • Engaging learning activities to help students achieve the course learning outcomes (e.g., in-class activities, homework)

To register, RSVP no later than Thursday, Dec. 27, to ctlrec@byu.edu. List your name and department and include your BYU e-mail address to receive materials related to the workshop before it begins.

For more information, contact lynn_sorenson@byu.edu.

Writer: Lynn Sorenson

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