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Intellect

Call for papers issued for 2007 Family History Technology Workshop at BYU

The Brigham Young University Computer Science Department has announced a call for papers for the 2007 Family History Technology Workshop.

Abstracts should address emerging technological research as it applies to family history, with topics such as digitized images of historical data, information integration, record linkage and family history-based search. All who enjoy learning about family history and technology are welcome to submit papers, as well as attend the conference.

The deadline for abstracts is Jan. 15. Papers should be turned in on the workshop’s Web site, www.fht.byu.edu. Notification of acceptance will be given by Feb. 2.

The annual workshop, which will take place March 15 at BYU, provides a forum for discussing current and emerging research on technology as it relates to family history. The goal of the seminar is to find ways to improve family history research.

For more information, contact Mindy Varkevisser at (801) 422-1472.

Writer: Elizabeth Kasper

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