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Intellect

BYU's David M. Kennedy Center plans panel discussion, lecture on Book of Semester

William Easterly's “The White Man’s Burden: How the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good,”

Four Brigham Young University faculty perspectives on the ideas presented by William Easterly in his book, “The White Man’s Burden: How the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good,” will be given Wednesday, Feb. 25, from 3 to 5 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

The panel discussion is a prelude to the Book of the Semester Lecture featuring William Easterly Thursday, March 5, at 4 p.m. in the Joseph Smith Building auditorium. All are welcome to attend both events.

Wednesday’s panel will include Randy S. Lewis, professor of chemical engineering; Daniel L. Nielson, associate professor of political science; Frank L. McIntyre, assistant professor of economics; and Joseph Price, assistant professor of economics.

Easterly is an economics professor at New York University and co-director of NYU’s Development Research Institute. He is also a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and co-editor of the “Journal of Development Economics.”

“Foreign Policy” magazine named Easterly one of the world’s “Top 100 Public Intellectuals” in 2008. His areas of expertise are the determinants of long-run economic growth, the political economy of development and the effectiveness of foreign aid. He has worked most heavily in Africa, Latin America and Russia.

These events will be archived online. For more information on events sponsored by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies, see the calendar online at kennedy.byu.edu. For more information about these events, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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