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Intellect

BYU's Alexander Woods, guest artists to perform early Italian violin sonatas Jan. 24

Alexander Woods, an assistant professor of violin in Brigham Young University’s School of Music, will perform Friday, Jan. 24, at 5:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

Admission is free and the public is welcome to attend.

Woods will be joined by visiting guest artists Avi Stein, harpsichord, and Ezra Seltzer, baroque cello, as they perform an evening of early Italian violin sonatas on period instruments. Most of the works were written by students and violinists who were influenced by Arcangelo Corelli, the great baroque violinist and composer.

The program will consist of early virtuoso violin sonatas by some lesser-known baroque composers such as Carlo Ambrogio Lonati, Evaristo Felice dall’Abaco and Henricus Albicastri.

Stein earned degrees in music at Indiana University, Eastman School of Music and the University of Southern California, and was a Fulbright scholar in Toulouse, France. He teaches vocal repertoire at the Yale Institute, studio harpsichord at Longy School of Music and continuo accompaniment at the Julliard School.

Seltzer graduated from the inaugural class of Julliard’s historical performance program and earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music at Yale University.

Woods is a graduate of the Manhattan School of Music and Yale University where he received a master’s degree in violin performance. He has had a substantial career as a chamber musician, soloist and orchestral player in some of the most renowned venues in the world, including Carnegie Hall, Avery Fisher Hall, the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and the National Arts Centre in Canada.

For more information, contact Alexander Woods at (801) 422-3342 or agwoods@gmail.com.

Writer: Brett Lee

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