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Intellect

BYU Women's Studies Colloquium sponsors lecture series

The Women's Studies Colloquium is sponsoring a series of free lectures on research about women this fall on the Brigham Young University campus.

Faculty from across campus will speak at the lectures, which will be held in 325 Spencer W. Kimball Tower at noon.

The lectures include:

*Sept. 25, "Women's Ideology of the Protestant Movement in an Indigenous Mayan Village," by student Adriana Smith.

* Oct. 9, "BYU's Women's Manuscript Collections," by Connie Lamb, anthropology librarian at the Lee Library.

* Oct. 23, "Women in China's Period of Disunion," by Michael J. Farmer, assistant professor of history.

* Nov. 6, "The Domination of Women and Peasants in Catalonia's History, 1000-1486," by Eugene Mendonsa, visiting scholar, Cambridge.

* Nov. 20, "The Feasibility of Intra-family Adoptions in the Marshall Islands," by Jini Roby, School of Social Work.

The colloquium is a scholarly forum for discussion, intellectual development and collaboration among students, faculty and others interested in participating in an interdisciplinary community of women's studies scholars.

Contact Angie Allred at (801) 422-4605 for more information about the lecture series.

Writer: Thomas Grover

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