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Intellect

BYU Theatre presents Oscar Wilde's 'The Selfish Giant'

Tickets on sale now for performances from May 30 to June 14

Oscar Wilde’s children’s story The Selfish Giant, a play about friendship, faith and the power of transformation, comes to life on the BYU stage later this month. 

Through the use of puppets and live actors, BYU Theatre presents a unique look at this universal and timeless allegory of Jesus’ love for all of us. The play focuses on a self-centered giant who is at first unwilling to share his beautiful garden with the children who long to play in it but then finds happiness when he at last welcomes the youngsters onto his patch of lovely earth.

The Selfish Giant

  • Story by Oscar Wilde
  • Adapted for the Stage by Teresa Dayley Love
  • Directed by Jennifer and Nat Reed

Performance Schedule

  • May 30-31, June 5-7, 11-13, 7 pm
  • May 31, June 5, 7, 13, 14, 2 pm
  • ASL interpreted performance: June 5, at 7 pm
  • Post-show discussion with the cast following the evening performances on June 5 and 12

Playing With Performance Workshops

Tickets: http://arts.byu.edu

  • Tickets are available online
  • $12 ($4 off weeknights/$3 off weekends with BYU or student ID, $2 off for senior citizens or BYU alumni)
  • $6 matinees
  • Age 2+: free, with paid admission

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