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Intellect

BYU student honored at American Astronomical Society meeting

Brigham Young University graduate student Tabitha Bush won the Chambliss Astronomy Achievement Student Award at the American Astronomical Society meetings Jan. 4-8.

Bush is the first BYU student to receive the award, which she received for her research on measuring the rotational velocity of stars. She will also receive a Chambliss engraved medal and certificate for her achievement.

“In astronomy, research is very important, and I feel like my research was taken seriously by colleagues in my field,” Bush said. “This award provides even more credibility for research at BYU, as students who have received this award come from well-respected science universities.”

During the largest astronomy conference in the United States, Bush presented her master’s thesis research on the velocity of stars, including a guide of 118 stars she measured.

“Knowing the velocity of stars helps us peer inside the stars, since we can’t see past the surface with our eyes,” said Eric Hintz, associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy as well as co-author of Bush’s journal article. “Every time one of the stars in her study is referenced, they’ll reference her publication.”

Bush’s research was published in the Astronomical Journal in September 2008.

“It is impressive to have one of our students come out on top, because she was competing against graduate students from every astronomy program in the country,” Hintz said. “Her example provided a boost of confidence to all our students who will aspire to win similar awards.”

For more information, contact Eric Hintz at (801) 422-4168.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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