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Intellect

BYU to screen "It's A Wonderful Life" Dec. 2

The Brigham Young University Motion Picture Archive Film Series will show “It’s A Wonderful Life” Friday, Dec. 2, at 7 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium on level one.

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the movie is 129 minutes long. The event is free and open to the public. Children eight years of age and older are welcome.

The Christmas classic stars James Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore and Henry Travers. Frank Capra’s time-honored classic of the indispensable nature of each person’s life was Stewart’s favorite film, and according to most sources, Capra’s as well.

One’s selfless sacrifice for others, as dramatized in the life of George Bailey, seems to hit some snags until he is taught a lesson about life — and death — by an angel. The print screened was Stewart’s personal copy, now in his collection at BYU.

For more information, contact Roger Layton at roger_layton@byu.edu or (801) 422-6687.

Writer: Charles Krebs

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