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Intellect

BYU professor of nursing presents simulation work at national summit

Patricia Ravert , an assistant dean at Brigham Young University’s College of Nursing and a nursing simulation technology expert, presented her work on the Simulation Innovation Resource Center at the National League for Nursing Education Summit in San Antonio on Sept. 19.

Ravert developed SIRC with 16 other colleagues, both domestic and international. The nine online courses are designed to provide nursing educators with ideas and best practices for incorporating patient simulation in their curricula.

“Simulation is essential to nursing education,” Ravert said. “You want students to know how to do procedures and practice without compromising patient safety. With simulation you have control and can give students a variety of experiences and scenarios.”

Ravert is director of BYU’s Nursing Learning Center. She has visited many universities across the country training nursing educators in the use of human patient simulators.

For more information, contact Alison Williams at (801) 422-2192 or nursing-dev@byu.edu.

Writer: Brady Toone

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