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Intellect

BYU prepares performances of Henrik Ibsen play "Little Eyolf" Feb. 29-March 10

Brigham Young University’s Department of Theatre and Media Arts will perform “Little Eyolf” by Henrik Ibsen from Feb. 29 to March 10 in the Margetts Theatre. Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. with matinees at 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 3, and Saturday, March 10.

Ibsen, who also authored "Doll’s House" and "Peer Gynt," is considered to be the father of modern theater. The play revolves around a Norwegian family divided by tragedy after the appearance of a mysterious stranger.

“This is a play about secrets and hidden longings,” said director Barta Heiner. “It is about choices and consequences and how those choices have the possibility of destroying lives.”

Tickets are $14 for the general public with $2 off for BYU alumni and senior citizens and $6 with a student ID.

Writer: Melissa Connor

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