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Intellect

BYU posts list of fall semester aerobics classes

BYU's Aerobic Fitness Program provides an excellent way for BYU faculty and staff and their dependants and friends to improve and maintain their health. "We have the most current variety of classes, best instructors and best prices in town," said instructor Deni Preston.

Classes like powertone, Pilates, yoga, water aerobics, step, kickbox, and high/low aerobics continue to be favorites with participants, who may attend their first class free before making a purchase.

All classes are for recreation only (not for university credit) and provide instruction in all levels of fitness. Visit http://aerobics.byu.edu for complete class schedules, prices and program details. Purchase cards at RB 112.

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