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Intellect

BYU to perform lost music by German female composers

Brigham Young University’s School of Music and Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages will present “My Lover’s Ghost: Women Composers and the Musical Sublime,” the fourth annual “Sophie’s Daughters” Recital of Germanic Female Composers’ Works, Friday, Oct. 21 at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

Admission is free and the public is welcome to attend.

Coordinated by faculty members Ruth Christensen and Robert McFarland, the performance will feature faculty members and students from the BYU School of Music, with piano accompaniment by Robin Hancock, as well as narrations by Alan Keele.

Selections will include pieces from such Germanic female composers as Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, Luise Adolpha Le Beau and Clara Wieck Schumann.

The annual recital began in 2002 when BYU faculty members Michelle Stott James and McFarland introduced Christensen to the Sophie Digital Archive, which provides internet access to overlooked or lost works of literature, music, drama, film and journalism by German-speaking women before 1927. Through several trips to archives in Europe, faculty members and students also retrieved other musical scores by Germanic female composers.

The recital pays tribute to these several composers whose works are relatively unknown or have been lost. The Sophie Digital Archive can be accessed by visiting http://sophie.byu.edu/.

For more information, contact Ruth Christensen at (801) 422-8949 or Robert McFarland at (801) 422-8331.

Writer: Brian Rust

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