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Intellect

BYU offers Young Musicians Academy for preschoolers

The Brigham Young University School of Music is now accepting applications for its 2011-2012 Young Musicians Academy, where two- three- and four-year-old children and their parents can learn to make music together.

Three classe levels are offered and will meet on Saturday mornings for one hour each from September 2011 to March 2012. Classes begin Saturday, Sept. 10, and will include 22 class periods.

• Children are eligible for the Parent-Toddler class if they are 18 months old by Sept. 1, 2011.

• Children are eligible for the Music Explorers class if they are 3 years old by Sept. 1, 2011, or if they have previously taken the Parent-Toddler Class.

• Children are eligible for the Music Explorers class if they are 4 years old by Sept. 1, 2011.

Tuition is $250 per child for the year. Applications are available at bit.ly/ykidmusic and are also available in C-550 Harris Fine Arts Center. Class size is limited, and early registration is necessary. 

To learn more about the program, visit bit.ly/ykidmusic.

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