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Intellect

BYU Museum of Peoples, Cultures offers summer youth programs

Brigham Young University’s Museum of Peoples and Cultures will kick of its original summer program Mornings @ the Museum Tuesday, June 7, at 11 a.m. A new program, Adventures-in-Anthropology, will be offered for a limited time in June.

Mornings @ the Museum is a free, hour-long program designed for children from ages 5 to 11 and will take place every Tuesday and Thursday at 11 a.m. from June 7 until Aug. 4. Accompanied by their parents, children will have the chance to explore and learn about new cultures. Each session includes a cultural presentation and a hands-on activity that children will get to take home. The themes for 2011 are “Archaeology of Utah Valley,” “The Art of Maya Textiles” and “Ancient Greece.” The event is free, but space is limited and reservations are required for attendance.

Adventures-in-Anthropology is a similar program geared toward teens ages 12 to 16. The themes for A-in-A are “Experimental Archaeology,” “The Archaeology of Bones” and “The Art of Maya Textiles.” This program will run concurrently with Mornings @ the Museum on June 9, 16 and 23, at 11 a.m. for one hour so parents with young children and teens can bring all of their children for a fun summer outing. Space is also limited, so reservations are also required in order to attend.

“These summer programs are a great way to keep kids up on their learning while still having fun,” Debbie Smith, education assistant at the MPC, said.

Reservations for Mornings @ the Museum and Adventures-in-Anthropology can be made by calling the MPC’s Education Office at (801) 422-0022. For more information, visit mpc.byu.edu or email mpc_programs@byu.edu.

Writer: Mel Gardner

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