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Intellect

BYU Museum of Peoples, Cultures offers free children's story time

Every Friday from 11 to 11:30 a.m. through December, Brigham Young University's Museum of Peoples and Cultures is hosting story time for toddlers and preschoolers. Each week, folk tales will be used to explore common elements like music, prayer and art among the ancient cultures of Mesoamerica, Africa and South America.

"It provides a cultural learning opportunity for the youngest of children," said Kari Nelson, curator of education at the museum. "It fulfills a role of teaching that is important but not taught in many places."

“Stories From Around the World” was created to promote learning and diversity awareness at a young age. Parents can bring their children to the museum where storytellers read books and lead exciting discussions with them to further enhance learning. The program is free and all are welcome.

The Museum of Peoples and Cultures is located at 700 N. 100 E. in Provo. Current exhibits are “Touching the Past: Traditions of Casas Grandes” and “Kachinas of the Southwest: Dances, Dolls and Rain.” The museum is open to visitors from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and until 7 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

For additional information, visit mpc.byu.edu or contact Erika Riggs, MPC promotions manager, at (801) 422-0020 or mpc@byu.edu.

Writer: Brady Toone

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