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Intellect

BYU hosts free concerts with Orpheus Winds, brass chamber artists

Brigham Young University’s School of Music will present a Brass Chamber Night Wednesday, March 15 and an Orpheus Winds performance, featuring faculty artists, Thursday, March 16, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

Both events are free and the public is welcome to attend.

  • The Brass Chamber Night will feature the Brasscraft Quintet, which includes Kurt Peregrine and Jonathan McClung on the trumpet, Jonathan Johnson on the horn, Kevin Stephenson on the tenor trombone and Jay Roberts on the bass trombone. They will perform “Rondeau” by Mouret, the Quintet No. 1 in B-flat major, op. 5 by Ewald and “Contrapunctus IX” by Bach. The BYU Trombone Choir, directed by Will Kimball, will perform Mendelssohn’s “Adagio,” arranged by Kimball, Carmichael’s “Stardust” arranged by Robert Hughes and Hartley’s “Canzona for Trombones.”

    The Trombone Choir includes Adam Bean, Michelle Flowers, Dallan Christenson, Kevin Stephenson, Sam Yamamoto, Neil McLeod, Danielle Rasmussen, Joseph Hansen, Matthew Johnson, Patience Christensen, Jacob Tingen, Dan Barrett, Zachary Crawford, Jay Roberts and Chris Lyon.

  • The Orpheus Winds quintet includes April Clayton on flute, Geralyn Giovannetti on oboe, Jaren Hinckley on clarinet, Laurence Lowe on French horn and Christian Smith on bassoon. The group will perform the Quintet, op. 423 by Carl Nielsen, “Serenade” by Karl Pilss and “Reflection” by quintet member Lowe.

    The quintet, originally known as the Faculty Wind Quintet, has been performing for more than 40 years and has featured a long list of BYU faculty artists.

    For more information about Brass Chamber Night, contact Will Kimball at (801) 422-2375, or for information about the BYU Trombone Choir, contact Jaren Hinckley at (801) 422-6339.

    Writer: Angela Fischer

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