Skip to main content
Intellect

BYU hosts Ballet in Concert Feb. 13-15

The Brigham Young University Theatre Ballet will perform an evening of romance and fantasy during "Ballet in Concert" Thursday through Saturday (Feb. 13-15) at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall. A matinee will be performed Saturday (Feb. 15) at 2 p.m.

Tickets at $10 for the general public with $2 off with a student or faculty ID are available in the Fine Arts Ticket Office, (801) 378-4322 or at www.byu.edu/hfac.

The BYU Theatre Ballet original production of "Goldilocks' Adventure", the Grand Pas De Deux from "Giselle" and a featured piece by guest choreographer Jose Costas will be performed on this year's program.

"Goldilocks' Adventure," choreographed by Theatre Ballet Artistic Director Jennie Creer-King, takes a young girl on an enchanted journey filled with surprises and imaginative characters. A fairy-tale princess, flower fairies, butterfly ballerinas and The Three Bears animate the story for family entertainment.

The ballet will feature Jenny Bawden as Goldilocks in the evening performances and Katherine Dixon will dance the part of Goldilocks in the Saturday matinee.

"Imogenes y Reflejos" choreographed by Jose Costas is a passionate piece celebrating and embracing his Spanish heritage creating a visual feast of movement that winds through colorful fabric with dramatic flair.

Costas, a former principal dancer with Ballet Hispanico, has performed throughout the United States, Europe and South America. A master teacher and choreographer, Jose received the Modern Dance Award in 1995 from the Puerto Rican Institute of New York. He has taught at California State University and is a faculty member at Orange Coast College.

The heartrending romance of the grand Pas de Deux from "Giselle" illustrates an interplay of love and betrayal creating an eternal tragedy that has captivated audiences for more than a hundred years.

Travis Chant will partner Lindsey Brown on Thursday and Saturday evenings and Adam Miele will partner Katherine Dixon on Friday and at the Saturday matinee.

"Veracity," a premiere piece choreographed by Theatre Ballet Artistic Director Jan Dijkwel, illustrates that affection and care may not always be enough to prevent separation and struggle, but it may be the means to a renewed sense of harmony and love.

The final dance of the evening is "Jammin' Classical," a fun and highly energetic creation by Jennie Creer-King who takes ballet to a new dimension. This exciting work, set to techno-classical music by Vanessa Mae, will rock the audience and the dancers.

Writer: Elizabeth B. Jensen

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

BYU study shows changing population and income patterns in rural Mountain West

November 22, 2022
BYU professors Samuel Otterstrom and Matthew Shumway analyzed population and income trends in the Mountain West region over the past 20 years. Their research confirmed the widening inequalities between less wealthy “Old West” counties known for traditional mining, farming and ranching, and wealthier “New West” counties boasting natural beauty and recreational opportunities like hiking or skiing.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU students learn from the healthiest humans on earth in the blue zone of Ikaria, Greece

November 17, 2022
There are five locations around the globe where people reach the age of 100 at 10 times greater rates than U.S. averages. These Blue Zones, as they are called, are home to the healthiest people on earth:
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

How paperwork at the doctor's office can lead to medical misdiagnoses

November 16, 2022
While HIPAA privacy forms are supposed to assure patients that their personal information will be protected, new research from BYU and the University of Utah finds that they cause people to lie more about their medical history rather than feel more comfortable about sharing information.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=