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Intellect

BYU Honors Program hosts annual Honors Symposium March 25

The Brigham Young University Honors Program will host the annual Honors Symposium, “Learning in the Light of Faith,” Wednesday, March 25, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Museum of Art.

The event will feature a catered dinner, museum exhibit tours, breakout sessions and a keynote speaker. Tickets for BYU students and faculty are available March 12-17 for $5 and March 18-19 for $8 in 350 Karl G. Maeser Building. Tickets are $15 for those who are not BYU students or faculty members.

Elder LeGrand R. Curtis Jr. will present the keynote address, “Fools Before God.” A graduate of the BYU Honors Program, he was sustained an Area Authority Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints during the April 2004 General Conference. Before his service as a Seventy, he was a member of the presidency of the Salt Lake University 6th Stake and president of the Italy Padova Mission.

Curtis received his bachelor’s degree in economics from BYU and his juris doctorate from the University of Michigan. He is a partner in the law firm Manning, Curtis, Bradshaw and Bednar.

For more information, visit honors.byu.edu, or e-mail honors@byu.edu.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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