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Intellect

BYU history professor receives prestigious appointment from secretary of the Air Force

Mark Grandstaff, associate professor of American history specializing in U.S. military and diplomatic history, has been appointed by James G. Roche, secretary of the Air Force, to the Muir S. Fairchild Visiting Professor of Strategy and National Security position at the U.S. Air Force Air War College in Montgomery, Ala.

This is a prestigious appointment for senior civilian scholars to mentor and teach the armed forces' highest echelons of leadership how to think about global military strategy and current U.S. National Security issues.

The Air War College annually prepares 265 resident and 3,500 nonresident students from all U.S. military services, federal agencies and 45 other nations to lead in the strategic environment emphasizing joint military operations and the employment of aerospace power in support of national security.

The goal at the Air War College is to learn the capabilities of aerospace power and apply that learning in the real-world international arena.

During Grandstaff's one-year appointment, he will also travel to London; Sydney, Australia; and Wellington, New Zealand, to consult with defense departments on U.S. allied strategies.

Writer: Elizabeth B. Jensen

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