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Intellect

BYU head swimming coach Timothy Powers to give devotional address Oct. 25

Timothy Powers, head coach of the Brigham Young University men’s swimming team, will speak Tuesday, Oct. 25, at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center for a campus devotional.

It will be broadcast live on KBYU-TV (Channel 11), BYU-Television, KBYU-FM (89.1), BYU-Radio and byubroadcasting.org, as well as on campus in the Joseph Smith Building auditorium and the Varsity Theater in the Wilkinson Student Center. Rebroadcast information is available at www.byubroadcasting.org.

The title of his devotional is “Prepare to Make the Difference.”

Throughout his 31 years coaching at BYU, Powers’ swim teams have won 11 conference titles, garnered 33 All-American awards and competed in the Olympic Games.

His BYU swim teams swam in the finals of every major world competition and won 30 straight seasons. In addition to his teams’ success in the pool, they have been ranked in the top five teams academically for more than 10 years.

He has served as president of the College Swimming Coaches Association of America and now serves in an advisory role as past-president.

Powers received his bachelor’s degree in health and physical education from the University of Montana and his master’s degree from San Jose State University. He served as a captain in the U.S. Army and fought in the Vietnam War, where he was awarded the Bronze Star and Air Medals.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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