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Intellect

BYU Folk Music Ensemble to present variety of styles in Nov. 6 concert

The Brigham Young University Folk Music Ensemble, directed by Mark Geslison, will perform Thursday, Nov. 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center.

Admission is $6. To purchase tickets, call the Fine Arts Ticket Office at (801) 422-4322 or visit byuarts.com.

The BYU Folk Music Ensemble consists of three different groups — a Celtic ensemble, an American bluegrass music group and the touring group that travels with the BYU International Folk Dance Ensemble.

The Celtic ensemble will perform Irish and Scottish music from the British Isles and Eastern Canada, including “Mason’s Apron,” a traditional Irish piece; “The Curse Reversed,” from Nova Scotia; and Alasdair Fraser’s “Mrs. Jamieson’s Favourite,” from the British Isles.

The touring ensemble will perform “Nicaraguan,” “Reasons Why” by Nickel Creek and “Rocky Top,” the state song of Tennessee.

Music of the British Isles is related to American bluegrass, as both come from the same roots and have evolved separately.

“Modern ears are accustomed to perfection because of today’s recording industry making overproduced, overperfect and sterile music in contrast to old imperfect folk music,” said Geslison, artistic director of the Folk Music Ensembles. “We are trying to bridge the gap between the old world’s imperfection and the new world’s perfection — keeping old music alive by making it familiar to the modern ear.”

For more information, contact Mark Geslison at (801) 375-1188.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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