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Intellect

BYU film series to screen "Gone With the Wind" Sept. 23-24

Brigham Young University's Special Collections Film Series will screen the epic film "Gone With the Wind" in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium at 6 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Sept. 23 and 24.

James D'Arc, curator of the Motion Picture Archives at BYU's L. Tom Perry Special Collections and director of the series, says the film is being screened to celebrate the launching of the series' sixth season.

"With 'Gone With the Wind,' we anticipate a tremendous audience response," D'Arc says. "This is only the second time in our film series that we have shown a film on two consecutive evenings."

The classic film tale of the American Civil War starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh has only been theatrically released once during the past 30 years. Although admission is free, D'Arc recommends that patrons arrive early as seating will be limited. No food or drink is permitted in the auditorium, and children 8 years of age and older are welcome.

Other films that will be shown during this year's season include "The Hunchback of Notre Dame," "It's a Wonderful Life," "The Charge of the Light Brigade" and "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre."

For a complete listing and schedule, please visit sc.lib.byu.edu or call Special Collections at (801) 422-3514.

Writer: Devin Knighton

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