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BYU engineering professor named Educator of the Year by state association

David Comer, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Brigham Young University, was recently honored as the 2004 Engineering Educator of the Year by the Utah section of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

Comer's current research focuses on increasing speed data transmission through the use of metal oxide semiconductor circuits. Comer's research is funded by Intel.

He has taught at BYU for 23 years, and has served as department chair and has also supervised many master's and doctoral degree students.

Comer has authored 12 textbooks in electronic circuit design and written more than 60 research papers. He has also consulted with clients such as IBM and Intel, who have applied for eight patents in Comer's name.

He has twice won the college showcase Teacher of the Year Award at BYU and was named the College of Engineering and Technology's Outstanding Teacher of Engineering in 1992. He was also named the Most Inspirational Teacher by the IEEE Student Branch in 1999.

Comer has also taught at San Jose State University, the University of Idaho, the University of Calgary and California State University, Chico.

For more information, call David Comer at (801) 422-4015.

Writer: Thomas Grover

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